Archive for the ‘Historic Buildings’ Category

Washington Pioneer Club

January 23rd, 2012 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 182 Comments »
Click Washington Pioneer Hall, date unknown, view S. E. 43rd & Blaine Str. E. Photo shows two-story brick building with arched windows and “Washington Pioneer Hall” carved near top. Sign on side says “Olympic Boat Works.” Image courtesy Washington State Digital Archives.

Planning The White Building

November 18th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 13 Comments »
Click Architectural drawing of the White Building by Howells & Stokes, 1908. Part of the master-planned Metropolitan Tract — the Cobb Building is the only one standing today. Demolished 1974. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Osborn’s Trinity Church 1921

September 21st, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 9 Comments »
Click Trinity Church, Everett Washington. Architectural rendering, 1919-1921, Edward Osborn, Seattle Washington. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Jensen’s St. James Cathedral

September 2nd, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 3 Comments »
Click The beautiful and peaceful entrance to the St. James Cathedral, Seattle, Washington. Ektachrome by Max R. Jensen. Circa 1950′s or 1960′s.

Mutual Life Building 1974

August 23rd, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 16 Comments »
Click Mutual Life Building, Seattle, Washington. Photo by Marion Dean Ross, May 4, 1974. Image courtesy University of Oregon Libraries, Architecture of Oregon & the Pacific Northwest.
Click Mutual Life Building, Seattle, Washington. Photo by Marion Dean Ross, May 4, 1974. Image courtesy University of Oregon Libraries, Architecture of Oregon & the Pacific Northwest.

Graham’s Seattle Deco

July 13th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 4 Comments »
Another John Graham Deco gem, like this 1932 study. Not built, if only… Click for the high res copy.
nolvadex steroids
buy diflucan where
Click Architectural study of proposed development for Second Avenue, Seattle. 1925-1935 by John Graham & Company. Image courtesy University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections Division.

The Torrington 1935

June 14th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 8 Comments »
Click The Torrington. Architectural rendering, 1935, Edward Osborn, Seattle Washington. There is no record that The Torrington was ever built. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Rendering The Rainier Club 1928

May 6th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 5 Comments »
Seattle’s Rainier Club, built in 1904, is now listed on the National Register of Historic Places.
antibiotics online from us pharmacies
Below find Bebb & Gould’s 1928 architectural rendering of a new wing addition that was completed in 1929.
medicine pills drugs antibiotics types
nolvadex steroids
Click for the high res image.
buy diflucan where
Click Architectural drawing of alterations & additions for the Rainier Club. Architect: Bebb & Gould, 1928. The Rainier Club was founded by Judge Thomas Burke, E.M. Carr, and W.A. Peters as a social club and boarding house for men in 1888. The current building was erected in the early 1900′s. It was designed by Spokane-based architects Kirtland K. Cutter and Karl G. Malmgren in the Jacobean-style and modeled after Aston Hall in Birmingham, England. Beginning in 1919, architect Carl F. Gould designed several additions to the club, including a complementary south wing and a new entrance in 1929. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Adding On 1949 Pt. 3

April 12th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 9 Comments »
For the past few weeks we’ve been studying architectural concept renderings for the Frederick & Nelson building’s 1949 addition. You can see the first here and the second here. Well the third time is charming — as you can see it’s extremely close to what was actually executed.
nolvadex steroids
Click for the high res concept.
Click Architectural study of Frederick & Nelson department store addition. 1949-1950. Frederick & Nelson was originally built in 1916 in the terra cotta clad steel frame structure typical of the sort done in Chicago at the turn of the century. It was later altered vertically and lost its original cornice. John Graham, Jr. was assisted by the architectural firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in the redesign of the Frederick & Nelson department store starting in 1946. John Graham, Jr. had taken over the firm upon his father’s retirement that same year. During the remodel three s toreys were added to the existing five-storey structure, shipping and receiving concourse w as removed from the street level to basement, and new elevators and a natural day-like lighting system on the main floor was installed. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Adding On 1949 Pt. 2

March 28th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 3 Comments »
Last week we had a look at one possible option for the mid-century addition to the downtown Frederick & Nelson (now Nordstrom) building. Here we have another idea from 1949, this time incorporat ing
nolvadex steroids
more or the original classical elements.
and penis growth
Click for high res.
Click Architectural study of Frederick & Nelson department store addition. February 1949. Frederick & Nelson was originally built in 1916 in the terra cotta clad steel frame structure typical of the sort done in Chicago at the turn of the century. It was later altered vertically and lost its original cornice. John Graham, Jr. was assisted by the architectural firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in the redesign of the Frederick & Nelson department store starting in 1946. John Graham, Jr. had taken over the firm upon his father’s retirement that same year. During the remodel three storeys were added to the existing five-storey structure, shipping and receiving concourse was removed from the street level to basement, and new elevators and a natural day-like lighting system on the main floor was installed. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Adding On 1949

March 22nd, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 3 Comments »
You know it now as the Nordstrom flagship space in the downtown retail core. The building was originally built, however, for Frederick & Nelson in 1916 with an addition coming in the late 1940′s / early 1950′s. Below find one study from John Graham & Company illustrating one possible route.
nolvadex steroids
Also check out this post from last year with actual photos of the upper floors coming online. Click for higher res.
nolvadex prescription
cheap prescription zithromax
Click Architectural study of Frederick & Nelson department store addition. February 1949. Frederick & Nelson was originally built in 1916 in the terra cotta clad steel frame structure typical of the sort done in Chicago at the turn of the century. It was later altered vertically and lost its original cornice. John Graham, Jr. was assisted by the architectural firm of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill in the redesign of the Frederick & Nelson department store starting in 1946. John Graham, Jr. had taken over the firm upon his father’s retirement that same year. During the remodel three storeys were added to the existing five-storey structure, shipping and receiving concourse was removed from the street level to basement, and new elevators and a natural day-like lighting system on the main floor was installed. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Rendering The Doctor’s Office 1923

March 4th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 5 Comments »
We’ve seen a few dramatic Edward Osborn architectural renders around these parts (click here). Today’s offering is a little more restrained though still admirable. Below find Osborn’s 1923 drawing of a Doctor’s Office in Seattle
nolvadex prescription
antibiotics online from us pharmacies
buy diflucan where
late penis growth
that was never built. Click for the high-resolution copy.
and penis growth
Click Architectural drawing of an unbuilt Doctor’s office in Seattle. Architect: Edward Osborn, 1923. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Rendering Washington Plaza 1965

February 18th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 19 Comments »
Earlier this month we had a look at Earle Duff’s J.C. Penney rendering from Northgate Mall. Here we are with more Duff stuff from the 1960′s. Once again Mr.
nolvadex steroids
buy diflucan where
and penis growth
Duff mixes architectural rendering with art while representing architect John Graham. The acrylic p
medicine pills drugs antibiotics types
ainting shows a concept of the Washington Plaza Hotel, now known in more cirular form as the Westin Hotel.
nolvadex prescription
Click for the ultra high-res glory.
Click Architectural drawing of Washington Plaza Hotel (Seattle, Washington). 1965. Acrylic on board by Earle Duff for John Graham & Company. The Washington Plaza Hotel opened in June 1969, its original circular tower becoming part of the Westin Hotel in 2001. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Rendering J.C. Penney 1964

February 1st, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 18 Comments »
Scope out lengendary Seattle architecture firm John Graham & Company’s beautiful acrylic on board rendering of the J.C. Penney’s at Northgate Mall from 1964. As you may know and for better or worse, the modern American mall concept was born right here in our city.
medicine pills drugs antibiotics types
According to U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection:
John Graham Jr. received international recognition for his large scale shopping complexes. Combining architectural skill with business acumen, Graham helped shape Seattle’s commercial environment after World War II. Born in Seattle to architect John Graham Sr., Graham Jr. enrolled in the University of Washington’s architecture program in 1926. Transferring to Yale in 1928, Graham graduted with a degree in fine arts four years later and initially pursued a career in merchandising rather than architecture. When John Graham Sr. retired in 1946, Graham Jr. took over his father’s architecture firm. When the post-World War II economy spurred suburban growth and expansive commercial development in King County, Graham, groomed in retail management, recognized the potential for innovative design strategies. With an initial collaboration with department store owner Rex Allison, Graham conceived the model for the suburban shopping center. That model was first realized with Northgate Shopping Center, whose key elements included a large scale complex with a combined concentration of shops, abundant parking and easy highway access. When Graham decided to enclose the entire complex, the modern mall was born. Founded in 1902 by James Cash Penney and William Henry McManus, JCPenny was chosen as the official name of original dry goods stores in 1913 when Penney accepted a majority ownership of the chain. Drawing show’ s an alternate name for the department store, propably an appellation used by the architect and not representative of the original signage.
Click Architectural drawing of J.C. Penney’s Department Store at Northgate Mall (Seattle, Washington). March 1964. Acrylic on board by John Graham & Company. Image courtesy U.W. University Libraries Digital Collection.

Rendering Seattle Art Museum 1931

January 20th, 2011 by Cliffe | Sorted Historic Buildings | 6 Comments »
I can’t get enough of the Art-Deco era conceptual drawings — this one being my favorite from Seattle.
cheap prescription zithromax
The Seattle Art Museum, which opened in 1933, can’t be far behind though.
antibiotics online from us pharmacies
nolvadex steroids
and penis growth
Check out this concept from architects Bebb & Gould. This is the good stuff — click on the image for higher res.
medicine pills drugs antibiotics types
Click Conceptual drawing of the Seattle Art Museum (Seattle, Washington), August-September 1931 design for entrance facade. Graphite and colored pencil on tracing paper by Bebb & Gould.